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What a nuisance

This has been feasted on by bloggers all over the freaking place, but The Bleat says it perfectly:

When I asked Kerry what it would take for Americans to feel safe again, he displayed a much less apocalyptic worldview. "We have to get back to the place we were, where terrorists are not the focus of our lives, but they're a nuisance," Kerry said. "As a former law-enforcement person, I know we're never going to end prostitution. We're never going to end illegal gambling. But we're going to reduce it, organized crime, to a level where it isn't on the rise. It isn't threatening people's lives every day, and fundamentally, it's something that you continue to fight, but it's not threatening the fabric of your life."


Tony Soprano doesn�t take over schools and shoot kids in the back. The doxies of the Bunny Ranch don�t train at flight schools to ram brothels into skyscrapers.

A nuisance?

A nuisance? I don't want the definition of success of terrorism to be "it isn't on the rise." I want the definition of success to be "free democratic states in the Middle East and the cessation of support of those governments and fascist states we haven't gotten around to kicking in the ass yet." I want the definition of success to mean a free Lebanon and free Iran and a Saudi Arabia that realizes there's no point in funding the fundies. An Egypt that stops pouring out the Jew-hatred as a form of political novacaine to keep the citizens from turning their ire on their own government. I want the definition of success to mean that Europe takes a stand against the Islamicist radicals in their midst before the Wahabbi poison is the only acceptable strain on the continent. Mosquito bites are a nuisance. Cable outages are a nuisance. Someone shooting up a school in Montana or California or Maine on behalf of the brave martyrs of Fallujah isn't a nuisance. It's war.

But that's not the key phrase. This matters: We have to get back to the place we were.

But when we were there we were blind. When we were there we losing. When we were there we died. We have to get back to the place we were. We have to get back to 9/10? We have to get back to the place we were. So we can go through it all again? We have to get back to the place we were. And forget all we've learned and done? We have to get back to the place we were. No. I don�t want to go back there. Planes into towers. That changed the terms. I am remarkably disinterested in returning to a place where such things are unimaginable. Where our nighmares are their dreams.

We have to get back to the place we were.

No. We have to go the place where they are.
  • Current Mood: determined determined
Re: What does it take to feel safe again?
(Anonymous)
(Continuation...)

allisnow, you mentioned the elections in Afghanistan. I too am incredibly happy that there things are improving at a good rate. There are still every day bombs blowing up innocent people and death and poverty will stay in the country for many years to come. But it is an improvement. After 20 years of war with ever-changing enemies this country is finally starting to see calmer days ahead. Even though poppies are still the main produce of Afghanistan and drug lords still rule much of the country.

Why is Afghanistan a (I dare to say it) "success" and Iraq a disaster? Because the world as a whole supported the invasion of Afghanistan. The Afghan people don't feel dominated by one nation but helped by all. And if Iraq had been invaded under a UN mandate the situation would be the same. But as Bush realised such a mandate will not be given by the security council he simply went ahead instead of some well-guided diplomacy.

That's where Bush failed big time!
Re: What does it take to feel safe again?
Why is Afghanistan a (I dare to say it) "success" and Iraq a disaster?

Because they are two different countries in different situations with different pre-existing forms of government.

I think your opinion that "everything would be okay if only Kofi Annan had made his face to smile upon us" shows a serious lack of understanding.
Re: What does it take to feel safe again?
(Anonymous)
Yes, they are two different countries with two different systems of non-democratic dictatorships before the invasions. I am glad we agree on this part. Could you flesh out a bit why you think one was a relative success and the other a relative disaster? Simply saying they are different doesn't quite cut it, I'd say.

Oh, don't get me wrong! If Kofi Annan smiles upon us or not is not at all what I care about. But don't you think it would have been "nice" if the rest of the world would have seen the threat in the same way as Bush? Do you remember how Powell tried to convince the security council with words such as "clearly" and "it is obvious"? But the security council suggested to give the UN inspectors more time to find the WMDs.

Now, we all know by now that they couldn't find any WMDs as they simply didn't exist. We all know by now that Saddam simply wasn't an international threat anymore. In fact, his power had started to fade and simply by waiting one more year he might have disappeared all by himself - without the loss of any US lives...

Sooo... Bush still is to blame for going in without patience and against international law.
Re: What does it take to feel safe again?
Sorry, but your comments show an ignorance that's just too deep for me to bother going into specifics. It's astounding, actually.